For example if you are running a server: - If there is a kernel or glibc update, you need to reboot, with all the implications to your service.

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These may be re-enabled using the instructions at Support for the legacy v00 cert format has been removed.

* The default for the sshd_config(5) Permit Root Login option has changed from "yes" to "prohibit-password".

If I remember right, it will only flag programs that are in the changelog as "Added.", so it shouldn't add programs that were just never selected in the first place (so if you didn't install KDE when you first installed Slackware, it shouldn't prompt you to install it again -- you would need to override it using "slackpkg install PACKAGE/SERIES" to install missing applications).

I wish you were right with your recalling Actually it works like that only if you install the full Slackware, but not if you leave KDE (for example) out of the installation. I don't have any x86 system where I didn't fully install Slackware but on ARM I usually leave KDE out (no use) and I just made a print-screen - Slackware ARM 14.2 : https://s17.postimg.org/5dkl85a1r/I wish you were right with your recalling Actually it works like that only if you install the full Slackware, but not if you leave KDE (for example) out of the installation. I don't have any x86 system where I didn't fully install Slackware but on ARM I usually leave KDE out (no use) and I just made a print-screen - Slackware ARM 14.2 : https://s17.postimg.org/5dkl85a1r/I just tried removing wpa_supplicant (I don't use wireless on that machine) and when I went to run slackpkg install-new, it didn't prompt to install wpa_supplicant.

Most of the time, upgrades should be painless with little to no interaction from you beyond initiating the upgrade, but there is always the possibility of a "gotcha", so it would be worth your time to check it before blindly upgrading.

Also significant to look for is what packages are updated, not just for changes between versions, but for operational use.

They hope these examples will help you to get a better understanding of the Linux system and that you feel encouraged to try out things on your own.

Click Here to receive this Complete Guide absolutely free. Through searches I've found some information saying that the usual way to update is with: slackpkg update slackpkg install-new slackpkg upgrade-all slackpkg clean-system However, the slackpkg man page as well as other sources say, "install-new" is used when upgrading from one version to another, or running -current.

* Permit Root Login=without-password/prohibit-password now bans all interactive authentication methods, allowing only public-key, hostbased and GSSAPI authentication (previously it permitted keyboard-interactive and password-less authentication if those were enabled).

(* Security fix *)If you relied on connecting to root via ssh or used older encryption methods, you could've been locked out of your computer.

I know what "clean-system" does, and I've read it's best used when upgrading from one version to another.