However, in some cases third-rail was utilized and the electricity greater.

These numbers slowly receded into the 1920's as abandonment hastened through the 1930's.

By 1950 just 1,519 miles remained and the number dropped to 209 miles by 1959.

There were three great periods of interurban development; the first occurred during the 1890's and then reached a great flurry of construction between 19 when more than 5,000 miles were laid down.

The Panic of 1903 ended this fervor but it reignited again between 19 when another 4,000 miles were built.

It seems surreal that a train could actually fit on such a narrow patch of right-of-way where a railroad doesn't even appear to exist!

For power, most interurbans used overhead catenary (energized electric lines attached to line-side poles), usually rated at around 600 volts.

Ironically, the commuter services inteurbans provided are actually making a comeback as LRT (light rail transit) systems as cities look for alternatives to increasingly crowded highways.

What became the classic interurban all began in the 1870's with two key developments; in 1870 Zenobe Gramme unveiled a generator for commercial use while Werner von Siemens showcased the world's first electric locomotive at an exhibition in Berlin, Germany during 1879.

In an era before automobiles, when steel rails handled nearly all interstate and intercity travel, the interurban concept seemed viable, in theory.

There was also the added perk of providing some freight business.

A few, such as the Illinois Terminal and Piedmont & Northern, bucked this trend and blossomed into successful freight carriers while the Pacific Electric Railway is regarded as the greatest of all interurbans.