Zuckerberg, as well as Chris Cox, Facebook’s chief product officer, stressed that the feature is designed to spark meaningful connections—not help you find your next hookup.

But the reality is even Facebook doesn’t know yet how it will be widely used, if at all.

Tinder’s reliance on Facebook became painfully clear a month ago, when the dating app temporarily stopped working because of changes Facebook made to its data-sharing policies.

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For example, if you're attending a concert, you'll be able to "unlock" your profile, so that potential matches who have said they're going to the same show can see it.

The social network says it's going to start testing Dating later this year, and that it's not going to use information from the feature to target ads.

If you sign up for one of these apps, you can immediately pull in your Facebook photos, and autofill information like where you live, work, and went to school.

Tinder even shows users when a potential match has mutual friends with them on Facebook.

In the world of online dating, where up to 40 million singles search for love every day, first impressions are everything.

Your online photos and profile are your personal advertisement in cyberspace; they need to be amazing.In many ways Dating makes perfect sense for Facebook.Instead of allowing third-party apps to move user data to their own ecosystems, the social network is instead building its own. After all, Zuckerberg’s company started out as Face Mash, a “hot or not” game for Harvard students.Bumble, too, described itself as “thrilled” at the news, suggesting in a statement that “perhaps Bumble and Facebook can join forces.”They have a point: Dating apps will likely still have their own appeal.Historically, certain dating services have drawn specific crowds.Bumble can continue to offer a specific community, or unique features, like the ability for women to exclusively approach men first.