The story goes on to say that the Jews were offered the Torah last, and accepted it only because G-d held a mountain over their heads! , the words generally translated as "at the foot of the mountain" literally mean "underneath the mountain"!

) Another traditional story suggests that G-d chose the Jewish nation because they were the lowliest of nations, and their success would be attributed to G-d's might rather than their own ability.

For example, worshipping G-d in the form of a man would constitute idolatry for a Jew; however, according to some sources, the Christian worship of Jesus does not constitute idolatry for non-Jews. The word "goy" means "nation," and refers to the fact that goyim are members of other nations, that is, nations other than the Children of Israel.

There is nothing inherently insulting about the word "goy." In fact, the Torah occasionally refers to the Jewish people using the term "goy." Most notably, in Exodus 19:6, G-d says that the Children of Israel will be "a kingdom of priests and a holy nation," that is, a goy kadosh.

The 613 mitzvot of the Torah, on the other hand, are only binding on the descendants of those who accepted the commandments at Sinai and upon those who take on the yoke of the commandments voluntarily (by conversion).

In addition, the Noahic commandments are applied more leniently to non-Jews than the corresponding commandments are to Jews, because non-Jews do not have the benefit of Oral Torah to guide them in interpreting the laws.

Judaism maintains that the righteous of all nations have a place in the world to come.

This has been the majority rule since the days of the Talmud.I once received a message from a man who told me that many Jews do not like gentiles.He knew this because his (Jewish) girlfriend's friends and parents disapproved of him.Because Jews have had so many bad experiences with anti-Semitic non-Jews over the centuries, the term "goy" has taken on some negative connotations, but in general the term is no more insulting than the word "gentile." The more insulting terms for non-Jews are shiksa (feminine) and shkutz (masculine).I gather that these words are derived from the Hebrew root Shin-Qof-Tzadei, meaning loathsome or abomination.9, and are as follows: 1) to establish courts of justice; 2) not to commit blasphemy; 3) not to commit idolatry; 4) not to commit incest and adultery; 5) not to commit bloodshed; 6) not to commit robbery; and 7) not to eat flesh cut from a living animal.