S.” Shortly thereafter in 1986/87 Fesseha gave his first interview to Voice of America’s Amharic service.

The touring Ethiopian delegation eventually extended an invitation to him to do a similar demonstration in Ethiopia, which ended up with him hosting a workshop at the Hilton Hotel in Addis Ababa.

dating kalush-27dating kalush-90

“We have made a lot of progress in the last three and a half decades, and I get emotional when I think of how far we have come in just 30 years.” While working with the Unicode Technical Consortium in the early 90s (where he was the only African participant for 30 years) Fesseha was also responsible for proposing and pushing Ethiopic script to be the computer name instead of Geez or Amharic.

“This I did consulting with Ethiopian linguists,” Fesseha explains. It not only permanently codifies the computer reference to the language to be associated with Ethiopia but also correctly credits that the alphabet origination or development belongs to all Ethiopians.” “Necessity is the mother of invention.” For Fesseha it was his passion for writing in Amharic rather than his profession in the tech industry that initially inspired him to design the first known Ethiopic Script Software.

The film is scheduled to premier in Washington DC on May 9th at the Lisner Theater (GWU).

Zee first appeared on Tadias on our June-July 2004 print issue.

Fesseha was among those profiled here some 25 years ago in an article titled “Legends of Ethiopic Computing” for his role as the producer of the first usable Ethiopic word processor.

The article noted: “Ato Fesseha is best known in the field of Ethiopic computing for providing the genesis for the concept of computerizing the Ethiopian alphabet.” “The Ethiopian script has come a long way since it was first applied to a computer program in the early 1980s,” Fesseha says.

Notice to competitors: All information obtained from this website, including members' addresses, photos, materials, and text can only be used by our clients for private non-commercial use.

Use of this information for any commercial purposes without our prior written permission is completely prohibited and will result in prosecution to the fullest extent under the law.

“I loved writing in Amharic as far back as I remember,” recalls Fesseha in an interview with Tadias.