Samhain is also the name of a festival in various currents of Neopaganism inspired by Gaelic tradition. It appears, therefore, that in Proto-Celtic the first month of the summer season was named 'wintry', and the first month of the winter half-year 'summery', possibly by ellipsis, '[month at the end] of summer/winter', so that would be a restitution of the original meaning.

For instance, the contemporary calendars produced by the Celtic League begin and end at Samhain.

It is important to remember that all of the written documents in places like Ireland and Wales date to a time after the arrival of Christianity in the 5th century.

are still today the names of the months of May, August and November in the Irish language.

Similarly, an L├╣nasdal and an t-Samhain are the modern Scottish Gaelic names for August and November.

The custom has survived to some extent, and recent years have seen a resurgence in participation in the festival.

Samhain was identified in Celtic literature as the beginning of the Celtic year and its description as "Celtic New Year" was popularised in 18th century literature From this usage in the Romanticist Celtic Revival, Samhain is still popularly regarded as the "Celtic New Year" in the contemporary Celtic cultures, both in the Six Celtic Nations and the diaspora.

A WOMAN'S body has been found near to a Glasgow canal.

The discovery was made this afternoon around 1.30pm on Cleveden Road, next to the Forth and Clyde Canal.

"end") is a festival on the end of the harvest season in Gaelic and Brythonic cultures, with aspects of a festival of the dead.