They were something to behold, all chatting away while soldering so quickly, it didn't hardly seem like they were looking at the amps.

A 1957 tweed Vibrolux was reported with a tube chart printed with circuit “5E3” (tweed Deluxe) instead of the correct 5F11 (see photo).

Clearly Fender wasn’t afraid to use incorrect parts when they were in a bind. The 5G12 Concert is the earliest version from very late 1959 and early 1960 so the existence of a tweed example, while extremely rare, is certainly plausible since Fender was making lots of tweed amps during the same time period.

Remember, your amp is newer than the newest component.

For example, if you find pots from late ‘64 and transformers from early ’65, you can be pretty sure your amp is a 1965.

Although his job was somewhat limited, his recollections provided some really fascinating insights to how the amps were built.

For instance, he confirmed our assumption that the amp chassis were put into stock after being stamped with serial numbers and that the chassis were pulled from the stock bins randomly (just as with Fender guitar neck plates).

These are marked with EIA code “606” which is the company number for Schumacher.

Well, this universal “truth” was debunked when we found a bunch of amps with transformers made by the Better Coil and Transformers company.

It’s unknown if the tweed covering was a mistake (“Oops, I thought this was a 4x10 Bassman cabinet that I was covering”) or intentional, perhaps as a special order.