The promotion of healthy relationships in early adolescence represents a critical element of TDV prevention.The teen years are a malleable time during which healthy relationship behaviors can be learned, and preventing relationship violence early may disrupt stability across time and may ultimately prevent IPV in adulthood as well as the intergenerational transmission of violence.As an example of a new comprehensive approach that reflects some of the critical findings in this Special Section, the Division of Violence Prevention at CDC is embarking on a new initiative: involves a variety of primary prevention strategies to address gaps in prevention programming for youth in urban communities with high crime and economic disadvantage, who may be at highest risk for TDV perpetration and victimization (O’Leary and Slep employs universal primary prevention focused on 11- to 14-year-old youth.

Therefore, CDC will work with funded communities to identify and validate community level indicators for TDV, which eventually will constitute a sustainable tracking system for TDV in these communities.

Finally, to demonstrate whether the effectiveness of a comprehensive model of TDV prevention surpasses that of evidence-based, school-based curricula, CDC will direct a cluster randomized cross-site evaluation involving approximately 45 schools in Baltimore, Maryland; Ft.

) was selected for use with parents in Grade 6 because of its success engaging parents in urban communities, effectiveness in reducing youth sexual risk behaviors, and because it builds foundational skills of communication and positive parenting among participants (Miller et al.

was selected for use in Grade 8 for parents because its delivery method (mailed booklets to families) facilitates engagement of parents who may have limited transportation and availability and because preliminary results suggest it may be effective in reducing TDV victimization (Foshee et al.

comprehensive), it is anticipated that the evaluation will follow youth through the peak in TDV approximately at age 17 years (O’Leary and Slep ) and will examine multiple adolescent violent and risk behaviors including psychological, physical, sexual, and electronic teen dating violence, sexual risk behaviors, substance use, and peer violence.

If effective, the products developed for the initiative will be available and free of charge to the public.) implemented in Grade 8—and a comprehensive approach, which includes implementation of prevention strategies across levels of the social ecology for youth, parents, and educators in Grades 6 to 8, in addition to policy change efforts and communications strategies.was selected as the cornerstone of the initiative because of its demonstrated and sustained primary and secondary preventive effects on multiple forms of dating violence for boys and girls (Foshee et al.Evidence suggests dating violence is distinct in certain ways from other youth risk behaviors and youth violence, so programmatic activities target risk factors that have been associated with psychological, physical and sexual teen dating violence perpetration in longitudinal studies and factors that have been discussed in this Special Section.Individual level factors include youth substance use (O’Donnell et al.The initiative seeks to be socioculturally relevant to high-risk urban communities by training communities to make surface adaptations to program curricula.