For more information, contact Schuyler Hospital at (607) 535-7121 or email [email protected] in text: Schuyler Hospital President and CEO Jim Watson presents the Lou Sand Award to Paty Kelly.

On Friday (May 11), Schuyler County Attorney Steven Getman filed a nearly 250-page Summons and Complaint against manufacturers and distributers of prescription opiates for damages to the County arising out of what the Complaint deemed the fraudulent and negligent marketing and distribution of opiates in and to the County.

He called them “local heroes.” Among his messages, he said, was this: “Never forget how blessed we are to be Americans,” nor forget “our civic duty to stand up” and take action when our way of life is threatened.

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The ceremonial 21-gun salute occurred at the Montour Falls, Naval Monument and Veterans Memorial Park ceremonies. The color guard enters Shequagah Falls Park for the Montour Falls ceremony.

--“Paty is warm, empathetic and always looking to do the right thing for patients she sees.

The Montour Falls event -- an annual gathering at Shequagah Falls -- featured retired Schuyler County Judge J. (That post later ran a ceremony at the Schuyler County Veterans Memorial Park along Rt. will we remain free and strong and a beacon to the world.” In Watkins Glen, there were two ceremonies: a brief prayer gathering and “Taps” at the Naval Monument near the Seneca Harbor Pier, and a full ceremony -- held in the past in front of the Schuyler County Courthouse, but moved this year (due to road and sidewalk reconstruction) to the Community Center out Fourth Street. Rumsey, who served in the Marine Corps until 2000 and is now a member of the Schuyler County Sheriff's Office, said he served in the military with “some of the best people I have ever met who continued with their service after I was discharged.

SCHUYLER COUNTY, May 28, 2018 -- Memorial Day ceremonies were held around the nation Monday -- and in Schuyler County, observances occurred in Montour Falls, Watkins Glen and outside Odessa. Live music was provided by band members from Odessa-Montour High School, by bagpiper Tom Leslie, and by William and Donna Christoffels and Sarah Schlueter-Eisman. George Norton, the reading of a list of area veterans who died over the past year, and a color guard from American Legion Post 676.

“For many years the manufacturers and distributors of opioid pain medications have earned billions of dollars in profits flooding this Country with opioids,” said Napoli Shkolnik attorney Joseph L. “These lawsuits seek to force those companies to help clean up the devastation caused by these pills.” “These drug companies have poisoned our communities and polluted our children,” said Paul Napoli, counsel for Napoli Shkolnik.

Napoli leads the charge with Hunter Shkolnik against drug companies nationwide.

Today’s generation faces religious zealots” who “hate our freedom. It is all too common for criminals -- psychopaths -- to hijack their country.” These criminals, he said, are “murderers and thugs” who “don’t hesitate to lie and break laws. Today, their families will mourn them and honor them, as will I.” He said his family, back through several generations, have served in the military, and that his father, recently deceased, had “a very strong sense of honor when it came to people who served, especially his family.

228; the O-M band also performed at the Veterans Park, as did a Community Choir.) Norton, in his Montour Falls invocation, said that “in this place of beauty, let us remember that we are in a world torn by war.” Argetsinger -- who served in the Army infantry from 1967-69, and was with the U. Justice Department before moving back home to Schuyler County to serve as District Attorney and County Judge -- said that while he thought 25 years ago that the United States was free of the threat of invasion and occupation, now he thinks “not so quick.” “Liberty -- and this is an eternal truth -- does not come easily,” he said. that we can’t ensure our continued freedom without those who take up arms against aggression. A few of them aren’t spending today with their families.

Participation by his family in the military, he said, goes back to the Revolutionary War -- to an ancestor who fought in George Washington’s army for five years after seeing action at Bunker Hill.

He asked the audience of more than 100 people that when they see young people in uniform, to “keep in mind what they risk.” And he suggested that we also thank other risk-takers -- firefighters and police officers -- who despite inherent dangers believe they are just doing their job.

However, the Complaint alleges, the defendants spent hundreds of millions of dollars disseminating scientific materials and advertising that misrepresented the risks of opioids’ long-term use.