Of course, these codes are only applicable to original components, not replacement parts.WARNING: Ampeg amplifiers, especially the high-powered amps such as the SVT and V-series, contain lethal voltages even when unplugged and turned off.

The M-12 Mercury circuit of 1960 used 6V6 power tubes, but the Mercury circuit of 1965 used 7591As.

Likewise, an Ampeg from 1954 would not be covered in blue check vinyl whereas an amp from 1964 would have this covering.

Electronic Industries Association (EIA) codes can also be very useful for giving clues as to an amp's age.

These codes can be found on speakers, transformers, pots, capacitors, and multi-section electrolytic "can" caps.

The only date codes that seems to be readily available is found on the speaker magnet located under the bell cover.

The Ampegs made between 19 did not have serial numbers and must be dated in the same way as the Michael-Hull models, specifically, by finding the EIA date codes on pots, transformers, multi-section "can" capacitors, and speakers.It is important to note that parts do not always contain EIA codes, especially those parts from the late 1940s and early 1950s.Some common manufacturer codes for parts used in Ampegs include: The Michael-Hull amplifiers can be narrowed down to a date of manufacture between 19.An Ampeg from 1960 would be covered in navy random flair vinyl whereas an amp from 1965 would be covered in blue check vinyl.Another check for a 1960 versus a 1965 or later serial number (i.e.Nevertheless, for dating purposes, the serial number provides adequate information during this period.