The mid-Atlantic region, according to , has the highest concentration of Black and White lovers — this includes Virginia, Maryland, and D. I know what you’re thinking, “Are any of these interracial marriages actually lasting? Interracial marriages have a 41 percent chance of swirling out of control.Compare this to a 31 percent chance of divorce among same-race couples.Start Slideshow Romances, breakups, weddings, fitness, fashion, and style..name it, we've got the Hollywood highlights for you.

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Alabama was the last state to completely lift bans against interracial marriage in 2000.

How many famous interracial couples can you think of? In the decades since interracial marriage became legal in America, this type of bigotry is dying away, and these adorable celebrity couples just make it even clearer that love doesn't see race.

It’s been 47 years since interracial marriage was given the green light. Today, the approval gap is at its smallest — 96 percent of Blacks are a-okay with interracial marriages compared to 84 percent of Whites.

Unsurprisingly, Americans over the age 65 and residents of the South are least likely to support a racially-mixed family. They will just have to get over the fact that there are over 5 million interracially-married couples in the US, according to the latest census data. But which group, among all interracial marriages, are the most common? Take a look at the percentages behind America’s interracial combinations:points to “a steady flow of new Asian and Hispanic immigrants” in the West as the reason behind their high rates of interracial coupling.

As for American-born Asians, 46 percent married someone from a different race in 2015, while 39 percent of American-born Hispanics tied the knot with a person of a different ethnicity in 2015.

Personal views toward interracial relationships and marriage have changed even more dramatically in the U. A separate Pew survey recently found 39 percent of adults viewed intermarriage as a “good” thing for society, compared with just 24 percent who advocated for intermarriage in 2010.

When The Supremes were in full swing with their shimmery dresses and funky hairstyles, Black and White love was strictly forbidden. Well, let’s take a look at today’s interracial couples in America by the numbers, shall we? In 1969, 56 percent of Blacks were down for the swirl compared to only 17 percent of Whites.

But thanks to , a 1967 landmark Supreme Court case, today’s Halles, Paulas, and Imans needn’t hide their affections for their fair-skinned lovers. Today, a record-high 87 percent of Americans approve of Whites and Blacks tying the knot, according to Gallup. In 1995, 68 percent of Blacks approved while only 45 percent of Whites did the same.

Following the Civil War, many states, particularly ones located in the South, still had regulations that made it illegal for a white person to marry anyone other than a white person.